WRD98 Essay 2: “From Personal to Academic” <
Due on Moodle Monday, May 2, noo

Place your order now for a similar assignment and have exceptional work written by our team of experts, At affordable rates

For This or a Similar Paper Click To Order Now

WRD98 Essay 2: “From Personal to Academic”
<
Due on Moodle Monday, May 2, noon (week 6). Here’s where to turn it in.
<
Topic, purpose, & example
<
In this essay I want you to think about how something you’re interested in connects to professional writing or research. Start by choosing a topic that fascinates you — the quirkier the better. Don’t pick something boring because you think it will be easy to research. Actually, the opposite is true: obvious, overly-familiar topics have too many sources to choose from. Remember, the librarians are experts at searching; you’re still learning. If you find nothing, ask for help!
<
I’ll expect this piece to be longer than Essay 1: 500 words minimum, which is about two pages, formatted in MLA page style. Use informal citation, as described in this excellent CCC Library page, not a “Works Cited” page: turn your article title into a link the first time you mention it in your text. (That library page I linked to has links at the bottom showing how to do text links in both G-Docs and Word).
<
You’ll use only one main source, as in Essay 1, but this time it must be in-depth, challenging, and high-quality (see Jane’s post on our blog). You’ll be engaging with the source more deeply than in Essay 1 and summarizing it some detail — at least one paragraph. You may also bring in other sources for additional facts about the writer, background, etc.
<
The purpose of this assignment is to give you practice in how to summarize and respond to sources — as well as find good ones. Our textbook has a great section on how to do all of this, “Writing about Texts,” which I urge you to read. Here’s a great student example (also linked above.)
<
Your essay will not be designed to spur class writing and discussion as Essay 1 was. Instead, think of your audience as general readers — educated, curious grownups who will be paying close attention. You can still use “I” in the intro and conclusion. But try not to use “I” in the summary: just keep it objective (factual). Save your opinions for the final section. This is the key to the assignment, and to learning this skill: “divide and conquer.” Summarize first, then analyze. Don’t try to “mush” them together.
<
Like Essay 1, don’t write this as a traditional research paper! It’s a paper about one particular article and your response to it. The article you’re summarizing should be in the “foreground”; i.e., you’ll be talking about it directly with phrases like “The article begins with a description of…,” “Rodriquez argues that…,” “One thing Rodriquez doesn’t address is…” This is an essential college skill — to be able to talk about sources directly, using authors’ names in your text and having a dialogue with them, rather than keeping them in the background as is commonly taught in high schools. This is how NOT to do it: “Summer is almost here (Mount).” Instead, “According to my WRD98 instructor, Dave Mount, summer is almost here.”
<
Grading checklist & how to succeed
<
For an “A” I’ll expect you to have done all of these; for a “B,” most of them. To pass, half of them.
<
Include a cover note following the instructions on the assignment submission page.
<
Focus on something you’re genuinely interested in and choose a high-quality source.
<
Write at least 500 words.
<
Type in MLA page format but use informal citation: include title, make it a link. I won’t read papers that use parentheses for sources and/or list them at the end of the paper.
<
Follow the three-part outline below exactly. Do not mention the article in part one. In part two, just summarize it, don’t use “I.” Save all thoughts and opinions for part three.
<
Refer to article and author multiple times in parts two and three. Use at least one quote.
<
Add value at the end (part 3). Go beyond the article. Come “full circle.” (More ideas below.)
<
Show some progress in clarity and correctness (errors) from Essay 1.
<
Use this three-part outline: you can paste it into your doc
<
I suggest you copy and paste the text below into your document. Write underneath each category, then delete my words when you have a draft. If the format seems constraining, it’s only because this is such a crucial academic style to know. I’m being rigid about it because when you’re first learning to do this, it’s very hard to keep sections two and three separate: it might seem unnatural. You’ll have more freedom in Essay 3.
<
1. Introduce the broad, general topic. Why is it interesting to you? Why should others care? Then zero in on your specific topic. Maybe it’s skateboarding: start with how you got started doing it, then zero in on some aspect: maybe an issue like is it a form of meditation? It’s okay to be personal here and use “I.” But don’t say things like “I chose this topic because…” Say “I’m fascinated by this topic because…” or something similar. Don’t mention your article in this part!
<
2. Introduce and summarize the article. No opinions, don’t use “I”! Keep it factual.
<
Make a transition and introduce the article in a sentence or two, as you’ve been practicing, with the title as a link, and saying who wrote it, where, when, and why it’s good. Again, do not say “I chose this article because.” Use informal citation (title/link).
<
Unlike Essay 1, do not assume the reader will click and read the article. Tell us all we need to know to about the article, so we can understand section three of the essay.
<
Summarize the article objectively and in detail, in your own words. Quote at least one memorable phrase. The best way to do a good summary is to read the article, make a few notes, then look away from it and write the rough draft from memory. Then go back and check facts, add quotes, etc. This way it’s guaranteed to be in your own words. Do not include any opinions of your own in this section: save those for the final section. Here is some great advice from CCC instructors on how to write a summary.
<
3. Finally, respond to the article, build on it, & connect to your first section. What did you learn from the article? What new questions does it raise? What does it leave out? What do you question or disagree with? Where would you like to see scholars take this research in the future — what remains to be done? What connections can you make to it? Try to add some value. This will be the hardest part. Email me or see Mirielle in the Writing Center for help! At some point in this section, be sure to come back to section one: come “full circle.” Ideally, section three should be the longest section. It’s the “payoff.” But it’s also the hardest. So if it’s shorter this first around, I’ll give you ideas for revising. Be sure to mention this in your cover note.
<

For This or a Similar Paper Click To Order Now